Tag Archives: education

Top 10 Books of the Last Twelve Months


Summertime is great for reading. I’d like to share with you and recommend 10 books I have read over the past twelve months. I’d be glad to hear from you : what nuggets  have you discovered lately ?

This book is really cool. You travel from studio to studio of 20 contemporary painters and you discover how they work : daily routines, material they use, etc. This is like going in the kitchen of a great restaurant. Wizardry stands in the middle of apparently ordinary spaces and tools. But these have been crafted and customized to serve a unique purpose.

Edgar Schein’s last book is both simple and profound. If you are looking for fresh view on how to give and receive help, this is for you. Schein main point is that what makes whatever helping relationship so touchy is that it creates an imbalance between people. How can we deal with this imbalance subtly ? Find out more in this beautiful book of a wise old man.

Wow !!! I just loved this book. You may have seen Sir Ken Robinson in one of his TED talks, but The Element is different. It shows you through examples of real people how important it is for you to play “in the zone” – i.e. to find your Element.  This goes beyond what you’ve learned about emotional intelligence or creativity, it is about a lifelong quest to find where you will give the very best of who you are. And Robinson’s good news is that there is no age limit for this quest !!!

If you’ve never read a book from Timothy Gallwey, The Inner Game of Stress might be a good way to start. You will find many of Gallwey’s main themes and concepts, but framed to help you deal with stress. This legendary coach fights against many managerial myths. For instance, he tells us that stress is NOT good  and that stability is essential for performance. Now, you have to find your inner stability. And that’s where practical tools like drawing your “Tree of Resources” is so valuable. This book helped me a lot in a recent stressfull time, so I highly recommend it.

Is it necessary to present Nancy Duarte ? Probably not. Her last book his a jewel. Not only because it is so beautifully designed and illustrated, but also because it contains the results of years of research and experience. This really personal view of how to tell stories that resonate with your audience has wide implications for anybody who has a message to deliver – be it a simple presentation to your team or a public speech with a large audience. Nancy’s core message is simple : speak from your heart so that you can touch people’s hearts. But this means for you to be very clear about the future that you want to create. A special mention for the deep analysis of Steve Jobs’ and Martin Luther King’s well known speeches.

I read this book last summer and I can say that it truly changed many views I had about business in general and marketing in particular. The ambition and reach of The Power of Pull are wider, though. Seely Brown, Hagel and Davison embark us on a journey towards our present and future society. What they say is that new technologies – social media particularly – have changed the rules of the game : we leave the world of “Push” logic and behaviours for a world of “Pull”. Implications are enormous in many fields (business, education, science,…) but they require very different skills and attitudes from us. The authors invite us to take part in this flow of discovering where our passion is, sharing our knowledge, connecting with the tribes that are relevant to us – both locally and globally.

OK, Guy Kawasaki is not only an expert in the art of Enchantment but also in the art of Recycling (former books, articles or posts…) BUT his talent lies in his ability to deliver very practical wisdom… to live your life fully. His point is that whatever client or boss (or reader or family or …) you have, you can enchant their lives. And this is a GREAT purpose. Guy believes in it. Guy genuinely inspires us. Guy gives down-to-earth advice. I loved this book because it is actually a book on leadership in the age of disenchantment (a wink to Max Weber) and I think that our times desperately need such leaders.

This could have been an Appendix or a special Bonus of  The Power of Pull (see above). But I think it is much more than that. John Seely Brown and Douglas Thomas decifer the new way of learning in our world of social media. Playing (like in World of Warcraft), writing a blog, following experts on Twitter,… All these activities show us new ways of learning that are essentially social (within a community), linked with passion and building on our ability for imagination and play. Learning becomes a truly lifelong activity and Seely Brown and Thomas provide usefull keys to understand how this shift changes our current mindsets and practices. A must read.

Fish ! is a simple little book that opens your mind on the potential that is already present within your current workplace. It is not because the work of your team is ordinary that you cannot transform your days through joy, fun and meaning. Fish ! describes the change of a boring and execrable workplace to a sensible and joyful one. Why not giving it a try ?

In the spirit of changing the workplace for happiness, Henry Steward – happy CEO of Happy People (Great place to Work 2010 in the UK) – proposes us a tale about the transformation of a manager. It all starts on the beach, where this poor guy is not able to enjoy any minute of his holiday… Step by step, he learns how to let his team do the work (without him having to command and control). This book is full of practical insights and you can tell that they come from Henry‘s experience – not from a consultant’s utopia. As Isaac Getz puts it : Freedom works !

Can I Both Start an MBA and a New Job ?

This is the question that B., a former student, asked me last week. Of course, there are as many answers to it as there are different situations or people. Nevertheless, the conversation we had that day helped me reflect on our mindsets when we talk about training or education in the workplace.

Anyone would interpret this question as a “time management” question. Isn’t there a risk of a burnout – tackling at the same time the challenges of a new job with the demands of an MBA program ?

But this is a “How” type of question. Not a “Why” question. And in the case of B., the why questions would be phrased more or less like this : why did you apply for the MBA in the first place ? and why did you apply for the new job ? The answer to these questions is pretty simple :  B. wanted to have a more satisfying job (challenges, responsability, learning opportunities). MBA or new job are just means for this objective to be fullfilled.

Now, what gets into our way when we have such a clear objective. We get trapped into the constraints that others put on us. Who said that you should go to an MBA program in order to comply with each and every proposition being made by the B-School ? Who said that taking a new job necessarily means long hours and overload of work ? Aren’t you the master here – the client on one side, and the new leader on the other ? What if doing both were precisely an opportunity to learn how to help others grow instead of doing everything for your team, to learn how to focus on meaning, on the larger view, instead of micro-managing, etc. ?

Learning and performance have always been sort of separated. In the times of our fathers, you would train and then use the knowledge you got for the rest of your life. Maybe in your forties you would have an Executive Program to refresh some of this knowledge. But today, in the “brain industry” economy, half-life of knowledge is getting shorter and shorter. So learning is not something you can afford just once in a while. It has to be part of your daily tasks, just like checking your email. This is why I believe that “learning embedded in life” will become more and more common practice. Tim Gallway, the legendary coach, reminds us in his Inner Game books that there is a strong connection between three dimensions of work : performance, learning and enjoyment. If we separate these, we don’t get all the fruits of each of them. While the focus on performance is reigning in our organizations, it seems that learning is a sort of “obligation” – “yes, people have to go to training…” – not a powerful driver. And, of course, in many workplaces, one can wonder where enjoyment has gone (if it was ever present) ?

The conversation with B. made me reflect : “Couldn’t we dream of a workplace where we  could start each day as if we were on day 1 of both an MBA and a new job. This would be really enjoyable, no ?”